A thrilling narrative
of the
Jos crises

A thrilling narrative
of the
Jos crises

Calling Death is a captivating novel that explores the intricacies of uprisings in Nigeria. It is a bold book that juxtaposes love and hatred, fanaticism and kindness. It is also an account of what happened in Jos told through relatable characters.

Calling Death is a novel you wouldn’t want to put down.

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ABOUT THE BOOK

Eva and Leo are young undergraduates caught up in war. The duo had been unaware of the uprisings in the city of their choice. Now, they have to navigate falling in love with each other, denying it, and surviving the war. But their story is nothing compared to the war itself or to the loss that Mafeng encounters.

Our hero takes us through a narrative of what it feels like to be a victim of sectional hate and fanaticism. He loses his family to the cold hands of war and encounters a young chap venturing into the city. Although Mafeng did not intend it, his listener’s enthusiasm wanes on hearing the tales of what happened beyond the forest, at the place where they were now approaching.

Mafeng had just been bereaved in the wake of the lingering war that had just wiped out an entire village. It was a war with several faces. A war that is so domestic in its approach that it engulfs only one city and never spreads. A long coming war trapping people, some of them unsuspecting, at its arrival. The intensity as with most uprising is more astounding abroad than it is at home.

Mafeng is caught up in his grief and recounts to us a story of hate, which now makes co-existing almost impossible, and the gruelling aftermaths of fanaticism.

Calling Death is a story of pain induced by sectional hate and which turns out to be totally unnecessary or at least avoidable.

What Readers Say

“In this brave story of survivors and survival, Prudence Onaah captures our collective ability to suffer and forget.”

“A powerful and poignant account of the Jos Crisis.”

“Calling Death offers a narrative that reflects the untold stories and experiences of those caught in the throes of war.”

“No more are we confronted with mere numbers. We are given a living story of the dying and the dead.”

“The novel is a determined attempt to humanize lives realized at the edge of a knife.”

“Onaah draws a moving montage.”

“Calling Death resolves our estrangement from our humanity and forces us to confront the brevity of our superficial outrage that easily peters out upon the next distraction.”

“Onaah’s portrayal of the horrors of the crisis is reverential. She depicts psychological and physical wounds and death but still shields them with dignity, telling the stories of each individual scar the way only a lover can.”

“Onaah delivers a vibrant story that tenderly honours the tragedy of Jos.”

“Calling Death is the distilled memory of a keen observer.”

“Onaah writes about the Jos crises with remarkable heartrending tenderness.”

“Calling Death is both delightful and painful to read.”

“Onaah’s narration, as a moving dirge for Jos, goes beyond mere platitudes.”

“Calling Death is a poignant wreath that honours the memory of the departed and compels us to look at the trauma of the wounded living who die by instalments.”

“We see ourselves in Jos – beautiful and daring – yet broken in our very souls.”

“Through Calling Death, Onaah has chosen a rather delicate way to force us into acknowledging reality.”

“The narration style is masterly.”

“Even though one may not think of Calling Death as a thriller, it is actually a very riveting thriller.”

“Let me be the first to say that Prudence Onaah is one to watch out for; she has a sharp way of telling stories, where every line is as weighted, depth-filled, and thought-provoking as the next.”

“In Calling Death, as the traveller in the bus does for the character Mafeng, this author delicately, yet firmly pushes us to face the truth, and to remember to heal soon.”

“Calling Death is redemptive, in that it tells a story beyond the gory details of mindless war and bloodshed. It tells a story of love and family and kindness. It tells a story of strangers united by pain and loss, forming an unlikely bond, even for a short while. It tells a story of kindness even between supposedly warring factions. It tells a story of the near-death experiences that mark us. It tells a story of just how broken we are, without turning us out to be fragile.”

“I believe the most important story here is of life itself, beautiful and ugly in its existence.”

“This book is a true gem.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Prudence Onaah is a lawyer, writer and creative entrepreneur. She is an alumni of the University of Jos, Jos, Nigeria and the Nigerian Law School, Yenagoa campus. Prudence is an avid storyteller whose work has reached readers and fans in India, Australia, the UAE and the United Kingdom.

In 2020, she received the Iconic Personality Award and the Most Inspiring People on Earth Award. Prudence was writer of the launching edition of Golden Book of the Earth, a world records organization based in India and was a pioneer and project coordinator of Stop The Rape, a campaign that addressed the upsurge of rape during the pandemic. Her writing addresses societal issues and calls for positive social change in society.

authorphoto

In 2020, she received the Iconic Personality Award and the Most Inspiring People on Earth Award. Prudence was writer of the launching edition of Golden Book of the Earth, a world records organization based in India and was a pioneer and project coordinator of Stop The Rape, a campaign that addressed the upsurge of rape during the pandemic. Her writing addresses societal issues and calls for positive social change in society.

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